Rabbit with Prunes

A yummy and fruity preparation of our beloved rabbit. As our days in France are sadly winding down we are finding new ways to cook up one of our favorite proteins. The prunes, of course, add a sweetness to the dish and with the rabbit liver add a certain earthiness as well. This was the first time we had thickened the stew with rabbit liver blended with vinegar, and although the result was tasty the presentation was somewhat lacking. I’m not sure if our method was at fault or this is how is supposed to be. If you have any suggestions, please leave a comment.

Based on the recipe Lapin au pruneaux in Petit Larousse de la cuisine : 1800 recettes

A pot of strong tea
3/4 lbs of prunes
1 rabbit, about 3 lbs, cut into serving pieces
Rabbit liver
2 shallots, minced
Butter or oil for browning the rabbit pieces
1 sprig of thyme
1 cup white wine
1 T vinegar
Salt and pepper to taste

Soak the prunes in the tea for about 2 hours. Drain, remove the pits and chop coarsely.

In a Dutch oven, heat the butter or oil over med-high heat and brown the rabbit pieces. You may want to do this in batches to avoid crowding. Remove the rabbit and set aside. Add the shallot to the pot and sauté for two to three minutes. Return the rabbit to the pot and add the thyme and wine. Bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for about 30 minutes.

Meanwhile blend the rabbit liver with the vinegar in a blender or food processor. Add the mixture and the prunes to the rabbit stew and simmer an addition 20 minutes or until the rabbit is tender.

Serve with rice, noodles or potatoes and a crisp green salad.

Rabbit with Prunes

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This entry was posted in French Recipes, International Recipes and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Rabbit with Prunes

  1. Why do we not eat more rabbit in the United States? Why? Why? Why?

    • baidanbi says:

      I often ask myself this very question, but then looking at the bunny carcasses splayed out in the markets, I wonder if Americans are ready for such a thing.

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